TERMS USED IN GUN SAFETY DISCUSSIONS


TERMS USED IN GUN SAFETY DISCUSSIONS


1. MAY ISSUE – authorities may issue a permit if a citizen meets certain criteria.
2. SHALL ISSUE – requires a license, after meeting specific criteria, to carry a concealed handgun but the granting authority has no discretion in the awarding or withholding of that license once basic criteria are met. There is also no need to demonstrate “good cause”. (Florida)
3. NO-ISSUE – no provision in a state’s law which allows a citizen to carry a concealed handgun and the state will not honor a license or permit from another state. (Illinois, Wisconsin and D.C.)
4. UNRESTRICTED- no license is required to carry a concealed handgun. (Alaska, Arizona, Vermont)
5. CASTLE DOCTRINE – common-law principle that one is not required to retreat when in one’s own dwelling
6. STAND YOUR GROUNDS LAW/NO DUTY TO RETREAT LAW – Law-abiding residents and visitors who are in a place where a person has “a right to be” has “no duty to retreat” if attacked. A person feeling threatened may “meet force with force,” including deadly force.
7. LONG GUN – a rifle or assault weapon.
8. SEMI-AUTOMATIC GUN – a firearm or long gun which self-loads but needs the depression of a trigger for each round.
9. AUTOMATIC GUN – a hand or long gun that self-loads and fires continuously as long as the trigger is held in depressed position.
10. CONCEALED CARRY – the carrying of a concealed firearm in public with the appropriate license or permit.
11. OPEN CARRY- the carrying of a firearm in public absent the need to conceal that weapon. Open carry has many variations nationally including licensing (from stringent to not required), the need to holster vs. the ability to stash the gun in a pocket or waistband.
12. VEHICLE CARRY – The ability of a gun owner to carry a firearm or long gun in a vehicle and bring that vehicle anywhere, including parking lots of state owned schools and buildings.
13. “TAKE YOUR GUN TO WORK LAW” – the Florida law which prohibits most businesses and institutions from firing employees with a Concealed Weapon License for keeping a legal firearm locked in his or her vehicle while that vehicle is in the company parking lot (law lists businesses which may restrict guns on their premises).
14. SECOND AMENDMENT – The controversial amendment often cited as the justification for unfettered gun ownership. This amendment has two clauses, the first of which is usually ignored. That clause cites the need of a state for a “well-regulated militia” implying that the second clause which states that the right to own and bear arms will not be abridged, is operant only as a member of a militia. However, recent Supreme Court ruling (D.C. v Heller, 2008) has changed the long-standing interpretation of gun ownership as being a group right to being the right of an individual independent of group membership (militias).
15. BACKGROUND CHECK – the legal requirement that anyone seeking to purchase a gun would be subject to a FBI investigation to determine if historical or current legal barriers exist to gun ownership.
16.HIGH-CAPACITY MAGAZINE – a magazine is a storage device that feeds bullets into the chamber of a weapon. Typically, a magazine that stores between 10 – 30 shots is considered “high capacity”.
17. ASSAULT WEAPONS/MILITARY-STYLE ASSAULT WEAPONS – Definition varies, but generally refers to a semi-automatic firearm with pistol grip and a detachable magazine. A firearm designed and configured for rapid fire and combat use is considered an assault weapon. The lack of specificity in the definition is often used as a reason that such weapons cannot be regulated.
18. PREEMPTION – Florida has the final word on the regulation of firearms and ammunition within the state. Cities and counties, colleges and school districts may not make gun regulation laws or fail to comply with state laws.
19. “GUN SHOW LOOPHOLE” – An estimated 40 % of all gun sales go through private channels (newspaper, Internet, unlicensed sellers at a gun show) and, in some states, are not subject to a background check requirements.
20.FIREARMS DISARMING AND RETENTION TRAINING- Formal training as to how to retain one’s gun. “The number of officers shot with their own weapon is a testimony for the need for training in weapon retention.” (website: OMNIVORE). Weapon retention refers to the skills needed to prevent an assailant from forcefully taking a defender’s handgun and turning that gun on the defender. I
21 LEVEL III HOLSTER- Do to the design of the holster it is almost impossible for an assailant to remove a gun from the holster even if the person is unconscious. Police officer’s guns are housed in level III holsters. Level I have no constraints to rapid gun removal from the holster. Level II offers some form of minimal restraint such as a strap or flap which would keep the gun in place in a fall or stumble situation.